A Side-Step: Rodney Dangerfield and Dylan Thomas

Maybe it’s the day, or maybe it’s the mood, but as I reviewed some of the things I’ve thought about over the last month or so, I was reminded of a very cool scene in a movie that you probably did not see, because it sounded too stupid for words.

It wasn’t too stupid for words, and though I had to be dragged, kicking and screaming, to see the thing, and I am glad to say it was worth it.

It is the story of a wealthy man who decides to go to college (something he missed earlier in his life), when his son gets accepted at a prestigious school.  The man is rough, crude, and irreverent, but he is still determined to “make it” through the system.

The following scene is a part of his final board of exams.  He has just about given up, believing himself to be both a fool and a failure, when his English professor (Nancy Kellerman), reminds him of a poem they had studied together. 

I wonder if you will be as moved by this as I was (and am).

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3 responses to “A Side-Step: Rodney Dangerfield and Dylan Thomas

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    Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night

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    Do not go gentle into that good night,
    Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
    Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

    Though wise men at their end know dark is right,
    Because their words had forked no lightning they
    Do not go gentle into that good night.

    Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright
    Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,
    Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

    Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,
    And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,
    Do not go gentle into that good night.

    Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight
    Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,
    Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

    And you, my father, there on that sad height,
    Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray.
    Do not go gentle into that good night.
    Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

  2. There is also an analysis of this poem on line, I think you should know. I had forgotten that it was by Dylan Thomas. That gives me insight. My interpretation. No matter whether you are a success or not, whether you see with ‘blinding sight’ or not; whether you are cursed or blessed, we as humans will still ‘rage’ against the prospect of death.
    But that’s why we keep on writing, isn’t it? We do not simply give up. All the best, you all. Thank you Richard.

  3. Seize the day.
    Rage against the night.

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